The following is an excerpt of  “The Paradox of Our Age,” from Words Aptly Spoken, by Bob Moorehead.

We have taller buildings but shorter tempers; wider freeways but narrower viewpoints; we spend more but have less; we buy more but enjoy it less; we have bigger houses and smaller families; more conveniences, yet less time; we have more degrees but less sense; more knowledge but less judgement; more experts, yet more problems; we have more gadgets but less satisfaction; more medicine, yet less wellness; we take more vitamins but see fewer results.

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We drink too much; smoke too much; spend too recklessly; laugh too little; drive too fast; get too angry quickly; stay up too late; get up too tired; read too seldom; watch TV too much and pray too seldom.

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values; we fly in faster planes to arrive there quicker, to do less and return sooner; we sign more contracts only to realize fewer profits; we talk too much; love too seldom and lie too often. We’ve learned how to make a living, but not a life; we’ve added years to life, not life to years. We’ve been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet the new neighbor. We’ve conquered outer space, but not inner space; we’ve done larger things, but not better things; we’ve cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul; we’ve split the atom, but not our prejudice.

We write more, but learn less; plan more, but accomplish less; we make faster planes, but longer lines; we learned to rush, but not to wait; we have more weapons, but less peace; higher incomes, but lower morals; more parties, but less fun; more food, but less appeasement; more acquaintances, but fewer friends; more effort, but less success. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but have less communication; drive smaller cars that have bigger problems; build larger factories that produce less. We’ve become long on quantity, but short on quality.

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion; tall men, but short character; steep in profits, but shallow relationships. These are times of world peace, but domestic warfare; more leisure and less fun; higher postage, but slower mail; more kinds of food, but less nutrition. These are days of two incomes, but more divorces; these are times of fancier houses, but broken homes.

These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, cartridge living, throw-away morality, one-night stands, overweight bodies and pills that do everything from cheer, to prevent, quiet or kill. It is a time when there is much in the show window and nothing in the stock room. Indeed, these are the times!

Change starts with each person being individually responsible for their actions and behaviour.  What kind of world are we voting for with the way we choose to live our life?

Image  —  Posted: February 18, 2015 in 2015, world view
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Theoretical physicists have proposed a way they think will allow us to create matter from light. The experiment has yet to be done, but has passed peer review as practical and the inventors are in discussions with experimentalists with the equipment to carry it out. The proposal has created excitement because, while it has been accepted for 80 years that two photons of light could theoretically create matter, for that time the demonstrational proof was regarded as beyond the reach of lab equipment.

imagephoton-photoncollider

As Einstein’s much quoted, but seldom understood, equation e=mc2 tells us, matter and energy are connected. One can turn into another. Light is one of the forms of energy produced from matter in atomic bombs. However, going the other way is more of a challenge.

In 1934 Gregory Breit and John Wheeler proposed that, under the right circumstances, two photons of light would convert into an electron and its antimatter equivalent the positron. Breit-Wheeler pair production is classified as one of seven basic types of light and matter interactions (see chart below). The others all resulted in Nobel Prizes, either for the experimentalist who observed it or the theoretician who explained it. (In some cases, observations came before theory, whereas in others it was the reverse).

“Despite all physicists accepting the theory to be true, when Breit and Wheeler first proposed the theory, they said that they never expected it be shown in the laboratory,” says Professor Steve Rose of Imperial College London. However, the options open to experimentalists have expanded a lot since then.

Earlier this year two physicists from the University of Warsaw, Katarzyna Krajewska and Jerzy Kaminski  modeled the distributions of electron-positron pairs created when laser and non-laser photons collide, noting that the “rapid development of high-power laser technology has led to a renaissance of theoretical interest in strong-field quantum electrodynamics.”

Now Rose and his PhD student Oliver Pike have come up with a way to put this sort of modeling to the test. In Nature Photonics they propose a two step process. High intensity lasers would be used to push electrons until they are traveling close to the speed of light, directing them towards a slab of gold. The electrons’ impact would release high energy gamma rays. Ordinary gamma rays, such as those produced by many nuclear decays, will not do it. The photons produced here are 1000 times as energetic as those at at the division between X-Rays and gamma rays, or a billion times that of visible light.

Then it would be necessary to send the output of a high energy laser inside an otherwise hollow gold tube and fire the light at the tube’s inner surface to create a spread of wavelengths. If the high energy gamma rays from the first stage are directed into the ultra-heated center of the tube Rose and Pike believe the collisions between the two sorts of photons would not only produce electron-positron pairs, but do so in such numbers “of the order of 100,000 pairs” that they would be detectable.

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Clear liquid droplets can bend light, acting like a lens. By exploiting this well-known phenomenon, scientists have devised a cheap and simple way to turn a smartphone into a high-resolution microscope. The high-powered lenses cost less than a cent apiece to make, and all you need is a cover slip or glass slide, some common polymer, and an oven. The method would be immensely helpful for diagnosing medical conditions in remote areas and developing countries.
Conventional lenses are usually made in one of two ways. You can grind and polish a flat disk of glass into a particular curved shape, or you can pour gel into molds. These new lentil-sized lenses simply retain the natural shape of liquid droplets. They’re made of a gel-like silicon polymer called polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) — the same unbreakable, scratch-free stuff used for contact lenses.
And it really sounds quite simple to make. “We put a droplet of polymer onto a microscope cover slip and then invert it. Then we let gravity do the work, to pull it into the perfect curvature,” study author Steve Lee from Australia National University explains in a news release.
By adding small amounts of fluid to the droplet successively after baking the base drop, they managed to reach a (surprisingly high) magnifying power of 160 times with an imaging resolution of four micrometers. They varied the focal lengths by letting the drop hang and then curing (or hardening) them further in the oven.
“What I did was to systematically fine-tune the curvature that’s formed by a simple droplet with the help of gravity, and without any molds,” Lee explains. No complicated machinery needed. Here’s the step-by-step easy-bake recipe:
  • 1. Drop a small amount of PDMS onto the slide.
  • 2. Bake at 70 degrees Celsius to harden it and create a base.
  • 3. Afterwards, drop another dollop of PDMS onto the base and flip the slide over.
  • 4. Watch as gravity pulls the new droplet down into a parabolic shape.
  • 5. Bake the droplet again to solidify the lens.
  • 6. Add more drops as needed to hone the lens shape and enhance the imaging quality of the lens.
The whole lens was only a few millimeters thick and just over a centimeter in diameter. The team then designed a lightweight 3D-printable frame to hold the lens, along with a couple mini LEDs and a coin battery for watches. The attachment turns a smartphone camera into a dermascope to diagnose skin diseases like melanoma. Dermascopes can cost $500; this new prototype dermascope add-on comes to about $2. You can check out this comparison of the magnified images.

 

The new dermascope could be commercially available in just a few months, according to Lee. With a different app, a similar tool can help farmers identify pests in the field. And to think, the first droplet lens was made by accident. Serendipitous.
The work was published in the Optical Society’s Biomedical Optics Express this week.

The future of technology could hinge on a single material. The industry is currently buzzing over the potential of graphene, which is the strongest, slimmest and most malleable material in known existence. Graphene, which is a form of carbon, could change the way our devices look, feel, perform–and even interact with our bodies. Here’s how this sensational substance will influence the world of tech.

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Stronger Than Steel

Smartphones like the LG G Flex can heal themselves from minor scrapes and scratches, but graphene should take durability to the next level. The material is purportedly 100 times stronger than steel. According to the American Chemical Society, graphene achieves this strength because its carbon atoms are arranged in two-dimensional sheets.

Flexible Like Rubber

Researchers at Columbia University told the The New York Timesthat graphene could stretch by 20 percent. In other words, it’s pliable just like rubber. Samsung’s Advanced Institute of Technology has been experimenting with graphene transistors, which would allow for easy production of flexible displays on both wearable devices and handsets.

Graphene is also resistant to water, so the material could potentially usher in a new generation of waterproof devices whose chassis may not need to be sealed like today’s devices.

The Lightest, Thinnest Devices Ever

According to a study from the American Chemical Society, graphene is thin enough to stretch over 28 football fields. The material holds a ton of tech potential, as we could someday see paper-thin smartphones and tablets that you can fold up when not in use.

A video posted on the Times’ website shows a block of graphene powder balancing on top of flower–and you don’t see a petal move or bend.

Incredible Battery Life

Graphene will likely influence not just how our devices look, but how long they last. Northwestern University researchers built a battery made of graphene and silicon, which supposedly lasted over a week on a single charge and only took 15 minutes to juice up. If graphene goes mainstream, you could possibly leave your smartphone charger home when traveling.

Working With Your Body

According to Dr. Aravind Vijayaraghavan at the University of Manchester, graphene has the potential to interact with your biological systems. This would take today’s fitness-tracking tech to all new heights, as graphene sensors could possibly scan your nervous system or “talk to your cells,” according to the Times. Mainstream devices like the Samsung Galaxy S5 are showing a commitment to fitness features, and widespread graphene production could help make health-conscious devices the standard.

Outlook

Aside from its physical benefits, graphene is also one of the cheapest materials around. With Samsung, Nokia, SanDisk and IBM investigating uses for graphene (along with universities), we could soon see a host of exciting new devices that are stronger, lighter and cheaper for manufacturers and consumer alike.

via NYTimes.com


Many cultures view the disappearance of the moon as a time of danger and chaos.

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The Inca feared that a lunar eclipse was caused by a jaguar attacking the moon. They’d try to drive it away by making noise, including beating their dogs to make them howl and bark.

PHOTOGRAPH OF ILLUSTRATION BY LEONARD DE SELVA, CORBIS

Marauding demons, murderous pets, and ravenous jaguars are just some of the culprits that cultures around the world have blamed for the moon‘s disappearance during lunar eclipses.

During the night of April 14 through April 15, the first total lunar eclipse in more than two years will be visible across North and South America, and from Hawaii. (See “Viewing Guide: Watch Moon Turn Red During Total Lunar Eclipse.”)

While such celestial events are celebrated today with viewing parties, road trips, and astronomy talks, eclipses haven’t always been events that people looked forward to.

Many ancient cultures saw solar or lunar eclipses as a challenge to the normal order of things, says E. C. Krupp, director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, California. “Things that shouldn’t be happening are happening.” (See “Solar Eclipse Myths From Around the World.”)

Howling at the Moon

“[The Inca] didn’t see eclipses as being anything at all good,” saysDavid Dearborn, a researcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, who has written extensively on how the Inca viewed astronomy. Accounts written by Spanish settlers in the New World record the Incan practices surrounding eclipses, he says.

Among the collected myths is a story about a jaguar that attacked and ate the moon. The big cat’s assault explained the rusty or blood-red color that the moon often turned during a total lunar eclipse. (See“Lunar Eclipse Pictures: When the Moon Goes Red.”)

The Inca feared that after it attacked the moon, the jaguar would crash to Earth to eat people, Dearborn says. To prevent that, they would try to drive the predator away by shaking spears at the moon and making a lot of noise, including beating their dogs to make them howl and bark. (Read about the Inca Empire in National Geographic magazine.)

A Substitute King

The ancient Mesopotamians also saw lunar eclipses as an assault on the moon, says Krupp. But in their stories, the assailants were seven demons.

Traditional cultures linked what happened in the sky to circumstances on Earth, he says. And because the king represented the land in Mesopotamian culture, the people viewed a lunar eclipse as an assault on their king. “We know from written records [that Mesopotamians] had a reasonable ability to predict lunar eclipses,” says Krupp. So in anticipation of an eclipse, they would install a surrogate king intended to bear the brunt of any attack.

“Typically, the person declared to be king would be someone expendable,” Krupp says. Though the substitute wasn’t really in charge, he would be treated well during the eclipse period, while the actual king masqueraded as an ordinary citizen. Once the eclipse passed, “as you might expect, the substitute kings typically disappeared,” Krupp says, and may have been dispatched by poisoning.

Healing the Moon

The eclipse myth told by the Hupa, a Native American tribe from northern California, has a happier ending.

The Hupa believed the moon had 20 wives and a lot of pets, says Krupp. Most of those pets were mountain lions and snakes, and when the moon didn’t bring them enough food to eat, they attacked and made him bleed. The eclipse would end when the moon’s wives would come in to protect him, collecting his blood and restoring him to health, Krupp says.

To the Luiseño tribe of southern California, an eclipse signaled that the moon was ill, says Krupp. It was tribe members’ job to sing chants or prayers to bring it back to health.

Modern Myths

Not all cultures view an eclipse as a bad thing, says Jarita Holbrook, a cultural astronomer at the University of the Western Cape in Bellville, South Africa, in an interview last year.

“My favorite myth is from the Batammaliba people in Togo and Benin” in Africa, she says. In this myth, the sun and the moon are fighting during an eclipse, and the people encourage them to stop. “They see it as a time of coming together and resolving old feuds and anger,” Holbrook says. “It’s a myth that has held to this day.”

Ancient rituals will mingle with contemporary science as the Griffith Observatory marks the April 14-15 eclipse. “Based on past experience, we expect a very large crowd to show up,” Krupp says, as staff and astronomers gather on the Los Angeles observatory’s front lawn with telescopes—and with noisemakers.

“If there’s a celestial object threatened, Griffith Observatory is in the business of protecting and observing,” Krupp says with mock gravity. He plans to don his “official eclipse-dispersing wizard’s robe and hat” and lead marchers around the lawn with noisemakers, to scare off whatever is swallowing the moon.

Follow Jane J. Lee on Twitter.

 


All your thoughts and feelings are energy, and energy is vibration. Learn to Raise those Vibrations and watch your life change dramatically.

Your Aura & 12 Chakras: Keys to the Kingdom

1. Find something beautiful and appreciate it. Beauty is all around us, from the morning dew to the evening stars and everything in between. Most go through life not noticing all the beautiful things that are around them, and yes it’s every where, so take the time to notice them, and appreciate them when you see it. Whether it’s the scent of a flower or the way rain ripples in puddles of water, appreciate the beauty life has to offer.

2. Make a list of all that you are grateful for. Making a gratitude list shifts your vibrations from focusing on what you do not have to what is already abundant in your life. There is more to be grateful for than you could possibly imagine. You can start with “I’m Alive!” and expand from there. Gratitude is the Attitude.

3. Meditate. Sit in a comfortable position, close your eyes and breath in and out. Too often we rush through our days with a scattered brain leaving us in a state of anxiety and stress, Meditation helps to calm your spirit down and put you in a peaceful state of mind. 10 Minuets of meditation a day can change your life forever.

4. Do something for someone else. Giving to someone else shifts your thinking from “I don’t have enough, to I have more than enough to give to others.” Abundance is a high vibration.

5. Stop complaining and gossiping. Complaining and Gossip puts you in a very low vibration. Ask yourself “Are the things you are talking about bringing you more of what you want?” if not then, Stop complaining, and start finding ways to rejoice.

6. Move. Exercise. Get active. Vibration requires movement, the more you move the better your vibrations move. So Get Active! Dance! The happier you feel, the more you will draw happy experiences to yourself because you are operating at a different frequency.

7. Realize that you have more control over your life than you thought. You are not a victim to circumstance, past, family upbringing, trauma, or anything else. You can change your life in an instant. Just realize this. In many wisdom traditions this is called “total responsibility.” No one is responsible for how you feel right now but you. It isn’t a curse. It’s a blessing because it gives you your power back.

8. Breathe. Just sit and try to make your breath longer, fuller, and more relaxed. It has a direct affect on your nervous system and helps to calm you down. A calm vibration is a high vibration.

9. Do Something You’re Afraid Of Fear holds us back from being in a state of love and happiness, and facing those fears opens you up to a greater world of possibilities. Fear of Heights? Go skydiving. Scared of public speaking, say a poem at an open mic. You’ll begin to realize your fear was worse then the actual problem, and a sense of relief will wash over you.

10. Have a Meaningful Conversation with a Friend Rather than gossip or complaining, talk about you ideas. What do you have planned for yourself? what do you think is the nature of reality? Are we spiritual beings having a human experience? Talking about these things with someone helps to raise both your vibrations by thinking big. If you don’t have someone to talk to about these kinds of things with, there’s a community of higher minded individuals right here.


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Google Glass has received endless press coverage for its futuristic form factor and novel, consumer-friendly applications. The wearable computer, for example, allows users to see email and maps right from its heads-up display. But could a similar type of technology soon let users even see through skin?

That’s the promise of a new product launched today by Evena Medical, a Silicon Valley based imaging technology firm. Created in partnership with Epson, Evena’s new Eyes-On Glasses System enables medical professionals to essentially peer underneath a patient’s skin in order to more easily locate veins for IV treatments. The product, Evena boasted today in a statement, is “one of the first healthcare applications of smart glasses commercially available on a global scale.”
Evena’s Wearable Eyes-On Glasses Vascular Imaging System Utilizes Epson Moverio Smart Glasses Technology Platform
While it may sound a bit like the X-ray specs sold in the back of comic books, Evena’s Eyes-On system is a version of a proven vascular imaging technology. Eyes-On ports the tech into a head-mounted display, to better help nurses and other medical workers do vein detection. Rather than having to cart a system around, the new device is hands-free and “projects overlays of digital content onto the real-world in the center of the wearer’s field of view … enabling a seamless blend of the physical and digital worlds,” the company said in a statement.

What’s more, the device allows for digital storage, enabling nurses to document and share a patient’s vein patency throughout his or her hospital stay.

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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Epson Moverio BT-100

“Studies have shown that up to 40% of IV starts require multiple attempts to locate and access a vein, which not only wastes valuable nursing time but also delays therapy and causes patient discomfort and dissatisfaction,” said Evena CEO Frank Ball said in a statement. “With Evena’s Eyes-On Glasses, nurses can quickly and easily locate and access the best veins for each patient—even in challenging clinical environments.”

It’s a refreshing application of smart glass technology, and an impressive departure from the usual novelty applications that have been developed for products like Google Glass.